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The 2016 Internet of Things Landscape in Two Infographics

The 2016 Internet of Things Landscape

“An entirely new way of interacting with our world is emerging,” writes Matt Turck from FirstMark Capital. “The Internet of Things is about the transformation of any physical object into a digital data product.” The 2016 Internet of Things is occurring in five areas: the connected home, wearables, healthcare, robotics/drones, and transportation.

Meanwhile the security of IoT devices looms, with Linux founder Torvalds reminding us that “security plays second fiddle.” For instance, an Amazon Echo got confused and hijacked a thermostat after NPR was left on.

If you think that’s amusing, remember that with Alexa, Cortana, Siri, Google Now, and others, “you have a personal digital assistant that knows you,” Microsoft’s Satya Nadella says, “knows your preferences, has the ability, in a privacy-protecting way, to go and look at your information and your organization’s information and help you with your tasks.”

Plus: Learn how to build a motion sensing security camera with a Raspberry Pi. That reminds us of our own hack: a front desk AI inspired by Mark Zuckerberg’s New Year’s resolution.

Mobile is having an impact on the 2016 Internet of Things landscape

Onfographic courtesy Mobile Future.

Infographic: What Are Algorithms?

You May Have Heard: Instagram is moving to an algorithmically curated feed soon. This could be a good thing for users, but it’s worrisome for brands, Re/Code writes. While algorithmic feeds may save us from information overload, the New Statesman asks: Are these the curators we want?

Related, both Netflix and Twitter have made significant changes to their algorithms recently: Netflix updated it’s recommendation engine to better serve their growing global audience, while Twitter rolled out an algorithmic timeline.

Journalists analyzed the 11.5 million Panama Papers using optical character recognition (OCR) to transform more than 2.6 terabytes of messy information into a clean, searchable index.

All of this is powered by algorithms. So, what is an algorithm anyway? This infographic explains all:

What are algorithms? Credit futurism.com

Reality Check: Is Augmented and Virtual Reality Ready for Prime Time?

Is virtual reality ready for prime time? Virtual reality and augmented reality are on the cusp of going mainstream. Facebook’s Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and Sony’s PlayStation VR will all release VR headsets this year.

Not to mention HoloLens, Microsoft’s slick augmented reality headset that “blends computer-generated imagery with the real world.” It’s already shipping. The Oculus Rift deliveries have been slowed by a component shortage.

In an Oculus vs HoloLens showdown, TechCrunch says, “There’s no way of explaining how fast you’ll get used to the world suddenly having a layer of data over it.”

A new type of “console war” is emerging, with companies racing to build market share among early adopters. You can understand why: Bloomberg reports that VR could turn into a $1.5 billion business.

That is, of course, if developers can “craft immersive content that educates, informs or entertains” to meet customer demand.

And, what does VR mean for art institutions anyway?

Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, and the Arms Race to Control Tech’s Future

The current state of artificial intelligence in 2016

Artificial Intelligence represents the next chapter of the Information Age, and Google, Microsoft, Amazon, IBM, and others are engaging in an arms race to control the platform that dictate tech’s future writes the New York Times. “The relationship between big companies and deep machine intelligence is just starting.”

So, what counts as artificially intelligent anyway? The Verge explains the difference between machine learning, deep learning, and neural networks, how they work, and why the future of AI is likely to be more subtle than you think. The next wave in technology isn’t about the technology, but rather the market that emerges from the technology.

Deep learning is “a killer technology,” Nvidia’s CEO says in a Fortune article that covers all things AI, data centers, autonomous vehicles, and more. While AI is still in its infancy, the road to super intelligent apps and machines is starting to come into focus.

When you’re ready to deeply learn more, this eBook will teach you how to use deep learning to solve problems related to image recognition, speech recognition, and natural language processing.

tl;dr A Googler explains deep learning in just one minute

Did you enjoy this? Consider joining Emergent Future, a weekly, hand-curated dispatch exploring technology through the lens of artificial intelligence, data science, and the shape of things to come. Emergent Future is powered by Algorithmia, an open marketplace for algorithms, enabling developers to create tomorrow’s smart applications today

Terminating Tay – A Microsoft AI Experiment Gone Wrong

Tay, the Microsoft AI Bot for Twitter

You Might Have Heard: The Microsoft AI experiment with Tay, their machine learning Twitter bot, ended after a mere 24-hours. The company pulled the plug when she almost immediately turned into a sexist, racist Nazi. Tay was suppose to learn how to communicate like a human by engaging in conversations with Twitter users.

“This gets to the underlying problem,” Vice argues. “Microsoft’s AI developers sent Tay to the internet to learn how to be human, but the internet is a terrible place to figure that out.”

The New Yorker writes that “Tay’s breakdown occurred at a moment of enormous promise for A.I.” Earlier in the week, an AI-written novel passed the first round of a literary competition in Japan, and last week AlphaGo, the AI from Google’s DeepMind,defeated the top-ranked Go player in the world.

As information destined for humans is increasingly handled by AI’s, the need for an open dialogue about the ethics grows. Google and DeepMind still haven’t revealed who sits on their AI ethics board.

+ A question of lesser importance: why are AI’s like Siri and Cortana so clever, but so bad at empathy anyway? A recent study might hold the key.

Did you enjoy this? Consider joining Emergent Future, a weekly, hand-curated dispatch exploring technology through the lens of artificial intelligence, data science, and the shape of things to come. Emergent Future is powered by Algorithmia, an open marketplace for algorithms, enabling developers to create tomorrow’s smart applications today